(Part One)

You may read this and wonder what a weird question! That’s ok but I thought it was important for other carers to be assured that any question they ask themselves after diagnosis is all perfectly normal.  
I collaborated with several parents in the Facebook community Wouldn’t Change A Thing Parent Support group to write this so please do read to see what questions often go through the mind of a mum when she is given a Down Syndrome diagnosis.

Social Questions

Will she get invited to parties?
Will she have friends?
Will he be bullied?
Will nursery have him?
Will she get married?
Will other children make fun of him?
Will she be beautiful/pretty?
Do I need to live until 100 to make sure they’re safe?
Will he be ostracised?
Will people understand him?
Will she look like me?
Will everyone love her?

Scary isn’t it, but most new parents do wonder about the community and how they will treat their child? I honestly feel that this can be overcome with more children with Down Syndrome being seen in the community with their friends. More knowledge passed on at nursery and schools to encourage friendships and more parents being aware of these concerns and maybe talking to their children about Down Syndrome.

Ellie with her school friends

Functionality Questions

Will she be able to ride a bike?
Will he be able to drive a car?
Will I be able to work?
Where will he go to school?
Will he be able to walk?
Can she fly abroad?
Will she talk?
What will happen when we are gone?
Will she be independent?

These questions can be answered by parents that have been there before and I feel it’s important to be part of your local community to meet other families. All of these have been achieved by children and adults with Down Syndrome so there is no reason why not. Your child may take longer and they may experience health issues or other complex conditions that could affect them from achieving SOME of these.
The only one that can not be answered is what will happen when we as parents are gone but by seeing adults with Down Syndrome living independently, working and getting married; the future is bright.

Check out Down Syndrome in the News

Family Questions

Will my family want to see her?
Will my son get picked on because of his sister?
How will the additional care impact her brother?
Will her brother become overprotective and get into trouble?
Will this have an impact on her sister?
Can I still be a grandma?

Hard questions aren’t they as no-one knows how the family will react when they know the news. What I would personally say to a new parent is try not to give these questions much thought. Yes, you can still be a grandma, it isn’t impossible but by that time you might not want to be. To those that have a family with children with Down Syndrome, did you want to see the new baby straight away, I would love to know.

By writing blogs like this, the aim is to help you understand a little more about Down Syndrome, the aim is to help new parents with the knowledge that generally, most new parents feel and act the same and whatever you are feeling, thinking it is ok. To everyone else in society please bear these questions in mind when a family, a friend tells you their news of their child’s diagnosis and help them with any questions, concerns they may have; be there for them and empower them with positivism

As always thanks for reading and stay tuned for Part 2 coming soon. If you have any questions at all about this blog or about Down Syndrome, please do not hesitate to comment below or message me

Until Next Time
Sharon x

 

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